Why Tuesday?

Get Involved

‘Michigan’ Category

Thursday, March 27th, 2008

MI, FLA Left Standing After Primary Election Musical Chairs

Musical ChairsLooks like the game of primary election musical chairs may have ended, and now Michigan is left standing. Florida appears to be is in the same boat too, but — what timing! — today Florida Senator Bill Nelson, declaring “the system is broken,” proposed a package of national election reforms including regional primaries, the end of the Electoral College, and a proposal to examine secure internet voting.

The Michigan news came across my desk yesterday from the Detroit News (via Time):

DETROIT — A federal judge on Wednesday ruled Michigan’s presidential primary law unconstitutional and blocked the state from giving voter lists from the Jan. 15 election to the state’s major political parties.

U.S. District Judge Nancy Edmunds agreed with the American Civil Liberties Union, arguing on behalf of several small political parties, that the law’s provision giving the list of voters’ partisan preference only to the Democratic and Republican parties violated the rights of other parties.

What is wrong with our election system that we can’t count votes of folks who have gone to the polls to cast ballots? Entire states of citizens wanting their voices to be heard? Parties can’t agree with states, and states can’t agree with parties. Who loses? The people. What can we do about it? (more…)

Friday, February 15th, 2008

An Unconventional Convention?

Norman J. OrnsteinOf all the wild scenarios spun out for the 2008 presidential campaign, perhaps the least likely was the one we face: a Republican contest that was effectively over the morning after Super Tuesday, and a Democratic cage match that could go on and on and on — all the way to a tumultuous and unpredictable convention in August.

I, for instance, offered an unconventional convention scenario back in July, noting that the uniquely early start (called “front loading”) of the primary process, combined with the compressed schedule, could provide a formula for an extended, pitched battle, with no candidate getting close to a majority after Super Tuesday. But I made it clear that this was more likely to happen on the Republican side, where many plausible candidates were running against one another and none seemed to be getting more than tepid support.

The Democrats, on the other hand, already had a front-running candidate, highly regarded by most Democratic partisans, and an enthusiastic electorate that wanted to pick a nominee and get on with the big battle — ending the Bush era once and for all. (more…)

Thursday, November 22nd, 2007

New Hampshirites are thankful for a day to vote

Turkey

The primary election schedule tango came a step closer to its grand finale yesterday, as New Hampshire held tight to its traditional role as the “first in the nation” primary election. New Hampshire’s Secretary of State annouced New Hampshireites will vote January 8th, five days after the Iowa caucus.

The Michigan Supreme Court also ruled that state could vote January 15th, which is apparently what was holding up New Hampshire. The New York Times has the full story.

Happy Thanksgiving.

Tuesday, October 9th, 2007

Primary election tango continues

The game of musical chairs that is fast becoming our national primary election schedule got a little more dramatic today. Five Democratic presidential candidates took their names off the ballot in Michigan to protest the new and early date of Michigan’s primary.

Michigan Democrats violated Democratic National Committee rules by moving their primary earlier than the national party stipulates. Michigan’s primary is currently scheduled for January 15th, but according to the rules it shouldn’t be before February 5th. Despite today’s decision by their five colleagues, two presidential candidates, both U.S. Senators, decided to stay on the ballot in Michigan. To find out why, and who they are, check out the AP’s coverage of the story.

To read our previous posts about the primary election tango, and learn more about what an increasingly-earlier primary election season means for the voters of America, click here.

Tuesday, September 18th, 2007

Michigan election reform roadshow

WJRT-TV reports (video) that the state Senate Campaign and Election Oversight Committee has since June conducted five hearings throught Michigan to “gather feedback on election issues.”

Interestingly fact: turns out that Michigan has a law where every 16 years there’s a vote on whether to hold a state constiutuional convention. Kristen Abraham, the reporter in the video, says lawmakers are trying to figure out what to do if voters don’t chose to hold a convention, including how to enact election reform.

Here’s a quote from the piece by Michigan State Senator Michelle McManus (R-Lake Leelanau): “For the citizens and consumers of this state it should be easy to vote, and they should feel securte that thir vote counts, and that’s why were looking at election reform.”

The Committee is to report back about their findings in October.

Sunday, September 9th, 2007

Roundup: Last week in election reform

It was a busy week for us behind the scenes at Why Tuesday?, and in the world of election reform. What is election reform exactly? And who is the guy in the photo? Get the answers, and much more election reform news, by clicking below. Photo by Cheryl Senter for the New York Times.

(more…)

About Us

Why Tuesday? is a non-partisan, nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 2005 to find solutions to increase voter turnout and participation in elections... More

The Answer

In 1845, before Florida, California, and Texas were states or slavery had been abolished, Congress needed to pick a time for Americans to vote... More

Recent Comments

In France they last voted on a Sunday. France is despite the Bourbon legacy a largely Catholic country, yet they vote on Sunday...

Posted by Patrick on blog post Why Do We Vote On Tuesday?

I think weekend voting would make the most sense, as people wouldn't have tu run home after work or wake up early to hit the polling stations beforehand.

Posted by Zander on blog post Why Do We Vote On Tuesday?

Sunday would be inconvenient for Christians. We should, 1. Move the voting day to Saturday. 2...

Posted by John on blog post Why Do We Vote On Tuesday?