Why Tuesday?

Get Involved

‘Election 2006’ Category

Tuesday, February 19th, 2008

Vote Here, and Say Cheese!

Aperture

“Where do Americans go to cast their vote?” That’s a question that William Drenttel and Jessica Helf posed to citizen journalists during the 2006 midterm elections. The photographers were asked to shoot polling places across America, and now their work is featured in the current edition of the Aperture Foundation’s magazine. I was sent a copy by friend of Why Tuesday? and Aperture Foundation publicist Christina Caputo. You can buy a copy online and lean more about the Aperture Foundation here.

The project has relaunched for the 2008 election, this time with the New York Times.

Aperture was founded in 1952 by photographers Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange, Barbara Morgan, and Minor White, historian Beaumont Newhall, and writer/curator Nancy Newhall. The group is a not-for-profit arts institution dedicated to advancing fine photography.

Photo via Aperture.

Monday, February 4th, 2008

Why Tuesday? on Colorado Community Radio

CO Radio

Are you a Boulder (88.5 FM) or Denver (1390 AM) resident? I’ll be on KGNU’s Metro with Maeve Conran, Today at 3:00PM your time. Live elsewhere? Stream it live here. Rob Ritchie of FairVote is her headline guest.

Sunday, September 9th, 2007

Roundup: Last week in election reform

It was a busy week for us behind the scenes at Why Tuesday?, and in the world of election reform. What is election reform exactly? And who is the guy in the photo? Get the answers, and much more election reform news, by clicking below. Photo by Cheryl Senter for the New York Times.

(more…)

Friday, February 9th, 2007

Election Day 2006 – Thoughts from the People

We’re still alive here. Belated, but here; we just got this in from some engaged citizens who took their cameras out on Election Day 2006. Working two different neighborhoods in Manhattan- one of its wealthiest, and one of its least financially prosperous- the two teams get an informative and honest impression of the different pressures and pleasures of voting for the residents of each area. Not everything people say is what you’d expect, but the takeaway is clear: there are a LOT of people- of all demographics- for whom single-day voting (which is how we still roll in NY, unfortunately) is inconvenient, and if you have other demands in your life and lack the means to easily deal with them (i.e., affording a babysitter is difficult, or your work schedule is inflexible) those challenges become all the more difficult to surmount.

Big thanks to Penny Abeywardena, Valentina Ramia, Cyrus Dugger, Sarah Solon, and Emily Carmichael for taking to the streets to get this footage. And also to Cary McClelland for the very generous donation of the editing equipment and services required to bring the mini-doc to completion.

Monday, November 20th, 2006

2006 Turnout: Numbers are low. EDR of questionable impact in Montana. On we go.

The dust is settling, and all speculation is about the impact of this year’s election on national and foreign policy. If you’re reading this blog you’ve probably read a lot about this year’s elections already: about your own local or state contests and the national issues that galvanized the voter base.

Without being unduly negative, it seems like a good idea to attach some numbers to the adjectival discussion of this momentous midterm. The most straightforward one is this: according to the non-partisan Center for the Study of the American Electorate (CSAE), national turnout was around 83 million this year, or 40.4% of the population. There are some interesting details: despite strong/record turnout in states like Virginia and Tennessee, not all states with hot races saw turnout bumps- Maryland, Minnesota, and Florida all reported drop-offs, despite each having competitive races. Click here to read the full report.

It’s also interesting to see what effect Montana’s experiment with EDR had. Despite causing some delays, it seems to have run very smoothly. Did it increase turnout? A look at the CSAE’s numbers casts some doubt. Montana’s turnout in 2002 (the last mid-term election) was 48.02%, compared to 55.58% in this year’s election. That’s a healthy jump of 7.56%, compared to a 0.7% increase nationally. BUT, if we compare Montana to seven other states with races that were either tight or widely publicized (Connecticut, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Virginia), we see that they on average enjoyed a 6.55% increase in participation. Amongst that pack, then, it’s not clear that EDR had a dramatic effect.

Which isn’t to say that it’s not a good idea: even a small impact is good, so long as the integrity of the process isn’t compromised, as is any measure that makes voting more convenient for those who fulfill their civic responsibility.

What seems most important to us is to remember- amidst all the comparative values- that the numbers we’re dealing with are still very low. A look at the CSAE’s report shows that, even in states celebrating record turnout, we’re dealing with participation in the low 40- and 50-percent range. Even if one takes the higher numbers offered by political campaigns and various state offices you’re still in the same ballpark.

Bottom line: there’s still work to do. And there’s a big election in a couple of years. So we’re gonna keep on asking why, and trying to figure out how to get as many citizens into the voting booths as possible.

Tuesday, November 7th, 2006

Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger of California (R): “We have to make campaigns very positive…”

Props to the Road Team for blagging their way into what looks like a real press conference. As we fall off to sleep watching CNN/Fox/what have you, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger stands with his family on a verdant lawn. The Gubernator doesn’t think Election Day is the issue- he thinks a lack of excitement about politics is. A smooth and easy clip to mark the passing of another Election Tuesday…

ps If you can’t hear it, the Governor’s bon mot upon hearing Barnett’s follow-up question is, “Yes, we are moving into the weekend; joy joy!”

About Us

Why Tuesday? is a non-partisan, nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 2005 to find solutions to increase voter turnout and participation in elections... More

The Answer

In 1845, before Florida, California, and Texas were states or slavery had been abolished, Congress needed to pick a time for Americans to vote... More

Recent Comments

In France they last voted on a Sunday. France is despite the Bourbon legacy a largely Catholic country, yet they vote on Sunday...

Posted by Patrick on blog post Why Do We Vote On Tuesday?

I think weekend voting would make the most sense, as people wouldn't have tu run home after work or wake up early to hit the polling stations beforehand.

Posted by Zander on blog post Why Do We Vote On Tuesday?

Sunday would be inconvenient for Christians. We should, 1. Move the voting day to Saturday. 2...

Posted by John on blog post Why Do We Vote On Tuesday?